What My Year Abroad Has Taught Me

Comments 3 Standard

The Year Abroad is more often than not coined as “the best year of your life,” and so, you may have quite high expectations about what it’s going to be like. It is great when you are off traveling every other weekend in the sunshine, but adapting to life in a foreign country away from everyone and everything you know is not easy.

Always learning

Personally, a better definition for the Year Abroad would be that it is ‘an education.” Be it living away from family and friends for the first time, coping with a long-distance relationship or getting to grips with a foreign language and culture, the Year Abroad teaches you things about yourself and the world around you that you can’t learn from a textbook.

Still, despite the coined phrase, the Year Abroad doesn’t have to be the best year of your life, but you can give your best shot nonetheless – saying yes to opportunities that come your way, travel whenever and wherever you can, meet people from different cultures – it is definitely a year you will be reminiscing about for years to come, for all the best and worst reasons!

See my Year Abroad Bucket List

Julia, moi et Kam

Julia, moi et Kam at the Tortoise Sanctuary near Perpignan

Leading a more minimalistic lifestyle

When I first moved to Sheffield to start my first year of university, we had a car and trailer packed with all the things I needed and probably didn’t need for 10 months.

Boarding my flight to Carcassonne in August 2014 to start my semester studying in France, I felt so vulnerable with just a suitcase, cabin bag and rucksack for 4 months. Obviously I was able to buy things when I got there though (duvet, pillows etc!). When I finally left in December, I was able to give things away that I didn’t need anymore.

Moving again in January 2015 to Spain, I was better prepared and I managed to pack even less as I knew what didn’t use in France. Looking around my student room in Salamanca right now, I have very few belongings compared to my housemates who have x30 shirts or x10 pairs of shoes, but I don’t feel like I am missing out on much, except maybe some variety in outfit combinations.

I have one mini-dictionary and one book to read and that is the extent of my book collection here which is a shock for anyone who knows me. My wardrobe is quite bare; anyone who sees my photo uploads will probably know I am always wearing the same things. It can be frustrating, as I only have one jacket, two pairs of jeans, three t-shirts, for example, but I have come a long way since first year, and I am sure I won’t need that trailer when I move back to Sheffield in September. But I will make sure to bring plenty of woolly jumpers at least (it’s freezing, okay?!).

Me at the top of Les Arenes, Nimes

Me at the top of Les Arenes, Nimes

I’m not going to become fluent in 5 months

I knew this already but there is always that dream that I am going to wake up one day and just be fluent. I mean, this is my degree and what I am aspiring towards, isn’t it? All these things take time though and I am progressing.

I am lucky that I get to split my Year Abroad to immerse myself in two different cultures and languages. However I feel slightly envious of the Single-Honours and Non-Language Dual students who are spending the entire year focusing on just one foreign language and who can probably go that little bit further than I can.

I’m sure that if I were to have stayed in Perpignan this semester, my French would have continued to only progress and I would be going back to Sheffield in September more confident in the French language, instead of being in a ‘language dip’, which is how I’m feeling now that I have shifted my focus on to Spanish. Yet, if I were to have stayed, my Spanish would not have improved at all and that was something that seriously needed attention as when I arrived in Salamanca this January – I could hardly string a sentence together!

I should note though, that I still consider my French to be much stronger than my Spanish, and if I meet a French person and start conversing with them, I feel a serious sense of relief to be able to express myself with ease.

Either way, friends in both France and Spain have told me that my communication skills in *insert foreign language here* have greatly improved since I first arrived. The fact that others have noticed my progress is more than I could ask for and whether or not it is a lot or a little, this Year Abroad hasn’t gone to waste.

The world is a lot less scary than I once thought

Moving to a new city when I was eighteen for university was the scariest thing I had done at the time. New city, new people, living away from home – big life change. The idea of possibly living or working abroad after my degree was overwhelming and I didn’t know where to start.

After living out of a suitcase for eight months so far and moving to two foreign countries, the idea of booking a plane ticket and landing in a new place is not so crazy anymore, it’s strangely the norm. I know I can get by like this now. When people realise I’m not local, they are so friendly and do their best to help me feel welcome.

When I nearly fell down the stairs in Narbonne train station with all my luggage when I moved to France in August 2014 (no lifts/escalators), a lady helped me with my things and even offered me a car ride to Perpignan. I mean, how nice is that?! Strangers can become friends, unfamiliar surroundings can become a second home but you also have to be open to this change.

Still, the sense of achievement when successfully giving somebody directions in your new city and in the foreign language hasn’t died down just yet…

Of course, home sickness sets in, sometimes I just want to see films at the cinema in English, instead of dubbed Spanish versions and although the local cuisine is divine, nothing beats a chippie tea.

Carcassonne

Carcassonne

Learning to forget the plan

I pride myself in being a very organised person, possibly the most organised person I know other than my mum (I obviously get this trait from her!) and I like to plan things months in advance.

The more I travel though, the more time planning takes up and the need to do this has died down. I’m much more open to arriving in a place with no fixed plan except a few ideas of what I might like to do and take it from there.

I found accommodation for Salamanca all the way back in June 2014, way before I came here. I opted to find accommodation before I arrived because the idea of turning up with nowhere to live still unsettles me. However, despite organising everything to the final letter, I realised a little over a month in to living in the flat, that I wasn’t happy there, like seriously not happy. Accepting that things weren’t going as planned, acting on the knowledge I could do something about it was the best decision. Now I am spending my final 2 months here in a lovely, sunny flat on the other side of the city. I did have to go through a nasty confrontation with the landlord to let me move out though but it was worth it.

Salamanca

Salamanca

It’s the people, not the places that count

I have been lucky enough to spend my Year Abroad in two fantastic locations: Perpignan and Salamanca. One on the Mediterranean, with a beautiful beach nearby and close to so many incredible places to visit. The other, home to the most beautiful Plaza Mayor and the oldest university in Spain.

Canet-La plage, beach near Perpignan

Canet-la-plage, the beautiful beach near Perpignan

Despite becoming attached to these two locations, it is the friends I have made and shared this Year Abroad experience with that have made the journey so enjoyable – soppy but true!

On the other hand, it is much easier to befriend other travellers, Erasmus students or people in the same mind-set who are reaching out for friendships and people to talk to. Although this is wonderful, it is frustrating that it is so much harder to make friends with local students who already feel secure and have friends. I am still not 100% sure why this is a thing. It is such a shame that as an “Erasmus student” I can be reminded that I am “different.” “foreign,” “not from here,” because people in class choose not to acknowledge my existence, even though I can speak their language. Yet, when there have been international students at my home university in the UK, myself, other classmates and teachers have made them feel comfortable and included by engaging with them. It’s something that has perplexed me during my time abroad that I want to challenge.

10364220_10154910001965447_5854883874169345427_n

‘Travellers’ and ‘Tourists’ are different

I was first introduced to this idea when I visited Lisbon. The idea is that travellers are more involved and experience the places they visit more than see them: try to speak a bit of the language with locals, eat the local food or just move slowly enough to really absorb the feel of the place.

IMG_0604

Lisboa

 Travel is addictive: good thing, bad thing

The more I travel the more I want to continue doing it and I know I am not alone on this. I have caught the travel bug. My travel wish list is so long, and I am always looking online searching the ‘next possible thing’. So far on my Year Abroad I have visited many places, for example: Marseille, Barcelona, Villefranche-de-Conflent, to see Las Fallas in Valencia all the way to Bilbao and Lisbon! Although this has been an enriching experience, the more I travel, the more I realise how far I am from my home and family.

 Of course, it’s incredible to be swapping rainy England for sunny Spain and I count myself fortunate for this experience, but my Year Abroad has also given me a different perspective. I am British; I miss having a kettle in the kitchen, politeness, people smiling in the street and our culture’s ability to form a queue in an orderly fashion. I have an even greater sense of appreciation for my family and friends at home and what they do for me, that there is nowhere better than “home.” I hope to return from my Year Abroad to make the most of my time in the UK and not sulk when staring at all my amazing Year Abroad photos in 4th year. Okay, I can’t keep my word on that last one!

What have you learned from your experience living abroad?

If you haven’t lived abroad before, is it something you are considering?

Let me know in the comments below 🙂

Hasta luego,

Untitled

Advertisements

Au revoir Perpignan: 6 Things I will miss

Comment 1 Standard

The last four weeks back in England have indeed flown by and although I am eagerly anticipating my upcoming semester in Salamanca, I am sad to say that my semester in Perpignan has come to an end. So here I have highlighted a few of the things I will miss from my time in Perpi.

1. Les montagnes (the montains)

The views of the Pyrenees never failed to take my breath away. As the colder weather crept in during December, the snow began to settle on the mountains which made it even more spectacular.

View of the Pyrenees from Perpignan.

View of the Pyrenees from Perpignan.

2. Rousquilles

Always in the supermarket, patisserie or gift shop, the rousquille, a soft, crumbly wheel-shaped biscuit covered in icing is very paticular to the region and I will miss being able to buy a pack of these after a stressful day at uni.

Recette des rousquilles à l'ancienne

Rousquilles

3. Le bus à 1€

Throughout the Pyrénées-Orientales region, the ‘bus à 1€’ initiative allowes for extremely cheap travel to nearby towns and cities. I traveled to places such as Collioure, Banyuls-sur-mer and Salses this way. It was a great excuse to do a day trip as it didn’t cost more than 2€ to travel somewhere for the day.

 bus collioure

Le bus à 1 euro

4. Le français

This goes without saying. Four weeks back home and I already miss speaking French every day.

5. L’épicerie (the grocery shop)

During my time in France I frequented a local grocery shop where I bought all my fresh produce. The owners always recognised us, maybe because Kam and I were the only regular customers who were under the age of 50 and foreigners who intrigued them, but they always greeted me when I passed in the street and that felt nice. Also, the black grapes, raspberries and clementines from the region, vous me manquez déjà…   

6. Le climat (the weather!)

Last but most importantly NOT least: the weather. How could I write a blog post about the best of Perpignan without talking about the weather? It’s the south of France, it’s near the beach, it hardly ever rains… what is not to love? Even during December on my final day, I remember walking around outside in the sunshine without a coat and it was glorious.

Since returning back to the UK, what I have struggled to adjust to the most is the lack of sunlight. Any hardy Northern spirit I had accumulated in the last 20 years has seriously deteriorated. My trip last week to Sheffield only confirmed this further. How I managed to live the last two winters in Yorkshire is beyond me because current me could not cope! Hidden behind what feels like constant cloud cover in the Merseyside region, I feel like I am already lacking in Vitamin D, my tan has degraded by 10 notches and I can barely manage to get out of bed before 10am; whereas I was always up by 8am in France, greeted to beautiful blue skies (99% of the time!).

So there we have it. I loved the four months I spent in Perpignan with the great people I met. If you ever see yourself visiting the south of France, don’t neglect the charm of Languedoc-Rousillon, and especially, the Pyrénées-Orientales! I’ll round this post off with a few picture highlights from my stay in France below

.

Untitled

Seasons Greetings!

Leave a comment Standard

17/12/14. As I will not have any wifi at home for a while this will be posted late.

Seasons Greetings from Barcelona Airport departures lounge!

The first semester of my Year Abroad in France has finally come to an end. It feels like it was another world when I stepped off the plane at Carcassonne Airport on the 26th August in 30 degree heat and yet it still feels like I am still only starting my time here in France.

I was very much convinced that I had managed to get my suitcase under 20kg yesterday evening. I could not have been any more wrong. And yet this was after rearranging things between my suitcase, cabin bag and rucksack for a good long while. Yet when I placed it on the scales to check-in at the airport, my check-in bag came up as 26kg! Shocking. After flustering about with my belongings next to the Ryanair check-in desk, I decided it wasn’t going to get any better than this (down to 22kg). Purse at the ready, waiting to be told to cough it up, the man who served me let it slip and just stuck a massive ‘HEAVY’ sticker to my suitcase and let me go on my way to security. What a wonderful man, I cannot express my gratitude enough. I was also 22kg on my way out in August with Ryanair, yet I was charged a surplus fee of £20 (£10/kg). Miracles do happen, it must be Christmas.

The last few weeks have been plagued (okay, they actually weren’t that bad!) with exams. However I was lucky enough to get them all out of the way before Christmas so that I don’t have to return in January (yay holidays without revision!!!). I took my final exam on Monday, which was when I officially said goodbye to L’Université de Perpignan. On this tiny university campus, I have learnt a lot, improved my French and I can now say I have survived a semester at a French university – through the highs and lows, I survived. All I have left to do is receive my results in January in the post and start gearing up for Spain.

Although we have been studying hard this month, I have squeezed in some outings: a day-trip to Collioure, where the castle hosted a rather impressive Christmas Market and to Barcelona for a day with the Erasmus students (it was a free trip!).  I am so glad to have visited Collioure for a second time; it really is a gem in this corner of France, and to Barcelona for my third time this semester, where I made the most out of its shopping opportunities. Not forgetting that Kam and I were front row to see Carmen Danse on Saturday evening, the Serbian Ballet of the famous opera ‘Carmen,’ which I love.

Yesterday in Perpignan it was 16 degrees, the warmest city in mainland France for the day; it was quite amusing to think that it was mid-December, whilst many people were still eating on terraces outside cafés with no need to wear a proper winter coat. Although the weather hasn’t felt very Christmas-sy, there is now a Ferris Wheel outside the Castillet which I went on with Kam and Josafine yesterday. It was my final view of the beautiful landscape around the city, with the snow-capped mountains in the distance. Although, it felt more like a ride in a theme-park because it was so windy at the top and the box we were in rocked back and forth a little bit too enthusiastically…

Collioure. Sunset in December

Collioure in December. Just as beautiful as in the summer…

View of the Pyrenees from Perpignan.

View of the Pyrenees from Perpignan.

Last night (Tuesday evening), a group of us got together for a meal at an Italian restaurant. It was a lovely evening to be altogether for one last time before Christmas and before some of us leave to move on to different places. As anticipated, my housemate Taka managed to eat two main meals all by himself, and he even had room left for dessert. Although I expect nothing less, it is always a shock how he manages to do it. Julia and Kam printed me some pictures of our amazing travels together (Girona, Villefranche, Vallée des tortues, Montpellier etc.) and Josafine hosted a home-made burger meal at her house on Monday evening as going away presents for me. Kam and Josafine saw me off at Perpignan train station this morning which was so lovely of them, it was a great send-off. I have made some fantastic friends here, it has to be said.

Repas de départ. Leaving meal.10364220_10154910001965447_5854883874169345427_n As the weather has been so splendid in the south of France for the entirety of my stay, I am rather nervous to experience the winter delights of the weather in North West England for the next 6 weeks. I have many layers of clothing to put on for when I step off the plane in Liverpool.

Although I am more than happy to be returning to home comforts, I will miss Perpignan; I could not have asked for a better location or a better climate for such a reasonable price of living and I have made some great friends and memories.

France, it’s been amazing and I will miss you. But England and the land of crumpets is calling.

Untitled

Ma dernière semaine à Perpignan (en français)

Leave a comment Standard

08/12/14

Je n’arrive pas à croire qu’il ne me reste qu’une semaine à Perpignan ; on est déjà en décembre, le mois des examens. Bien que j’aie passé un très bon semestre ici jusqu’à présent, après seize semaines sans voir ni ma famille ni l’Angleterre, je serai prête pour y retourner et pour bien apprécier un petit peu de la culture anglaise, avant de démarrer mon deuxieme semestre en Espagne en janvier. Pourtant, après avoir vécu à peine quatre mois en France, je dois partir pour améliorer mon espagnol. C’est dommage, parce que je suis sûre que mes compétences linguistiques françaises amélioreraient beaucoup plus si j’avais l’occasion de rester dans un pays francophone toute l’année.

Il va être difficile de quitter Perpignan la semaine prochaine. Je ne savais pas avant mon arrivée combien j’aurais aimé cette ville française : ses montagnes, son accent catalan, sa culture. Je suis très contente d’avoir trouvé des amis proches qui vont me manquer terriblement quand je pars. Mais comme ils apprécient la tortilla autant que moi, j’espère qu’ils vont me rendre visite en Espagne le second semestre.

Parfois je me demande combien mon français s’est amélioré ce semestre, et même si j’ai beaucoup appris, j’ai trouvé qu’il est difficile de voir mon progrès visiblement. Cependant il y a quelques jours, j’ai rêvé en français pour la première fois. C’était quelque chose que j’avais espéré de se passer depuis plusieurs années. En effet, le rêve lui-même n’était rien de spécial ; il s’agissait de moi dans un supermarché en Angleterre pendant Noël après mon séjour en France. J’ai commencé à parler à quelqu’un en français car je ne pouvais pas me rappeler comment parler l’anglais. De toutes les choses, le rêve était un peu étrange, mais cela souligne que des progrès se sont certes réalisés! Mais j’espère simplement que je n’oublie pas comment parler l’anglais dans le processus…

Cela me rappelle de la façon dont j’ai dû téléphoner l’université cette semaine concernant le logement pour l’année prochaine à Sheffield ; je l’ai trouvé très difficile de parler au téléphone en anglais. Toutes les conversations que j’ai eues depuis août ont été parmi mes amis et ma famille avec un registre familier. Alors, j’ai dû me souvenir de parler de façon un peu plus soutenue : lentement, clairement et poliment. C’est si étrange, mais je crois que mon anglais a souffert un peu ; j’ai dû écrire un essai en anglais il y a quelques semaines, mais normalement j’écris en anglais seulement sur l’ordinateur car toutes mes notes écrites sont en français. Donc, lorsque j’ai écrit cet essai en anglais, j’ai fait tant de fautes d’orthographe « à la française »: par exemple, j’ai épelé « October » comme « octobre » et « line » comme « ligne ». Oh là là…

Quelques amies à moi ont remarqué que j’ai commencé à parler avec un petit accent catalan. En particulier, je prononce le mot « bien » plutôt comme « bien[g] ». J’ai à peine commencé à procurer un accent et rêver en français, et du coup je dois partir!

Tous mes examens auront lieu en décembre avant Noël, cela me donnera six semaines libres avant de déménager à Salamanque pour que je puisse voir ma famille, mes amis et même visiter Sheffield qui me manque aussi. Je suis très reconnaissante parce que c’est une situation très différente de l’année dernière ; où je n’avais qu’un week-end entre mes examens et le deuxième semestre qui ne m’a pas donné beaucoup de repos. Je vais passer mes premiers examens ce mercredi (le 10 décembre) et je vais terminer les examens le lundi 15 décembre.

Je comprends que mon dernier journal était en Octobre, donc je voudrais parler de quelques moments clés qui se sont passés depuis lors.

Tout d’abord, une journée inoubliable était ma visite à « La Vallée des tortues,» une réserve de tortues à Sorède qui se situe 20 minutes en voiture de Perpignan. Ici, j’ai appris les mots « carapace » et « écaille » en référence à l’anatomie tortue. C’était une très agréable après-midi ; bien que le coût d’entrée fût cher (€9), je pense que ce prix était acceptable parce que les animaux sont contents et bien soignés dans la réserve. On a même reçu une visite guidée ; c’était un petit groupe de dix personnes parce que c’était hors saison. On a eu la chance de rentrer dans l’enceinte, caresser une tortue et prendre une photo ! Dans les mois d’été, la réserve reçoit au moins mille visiteurs chaque jour, mais pendant mi-octobre, ce nombre est beaucoup plus faible qui l’a rendu possible ; pendant l’été, les visiteurs ne pouvaient que rêver de notre expérience !

Julia, moi et Kam

Julia, moi et Kam

Bien qu’il existe denombreux lieux d’intérêtdans cette région, je me sens un peumal équipée d’enprofiteren raison de safaiblessedes transports publics. Souvent, nosexcursionssont courtesen raison du besoin d’attraper le dernierbus ou train ; je ne peux pas nier que c’est difficile d’en vraiment profiter sans voiture et il y a encorebeaucoup d’endroits quirestent à découvrirpour cette raison.

Il y a plusieurs semaines, Kam et moi avons mangé à « La Bardiche » (une arme d’haste), un restaurant catalan médiéval à Perpignan ; il avait l’air un peu bizarre mais on voulait goûter cette cuisine très spécifique que l’on ne peut pas trouver autre part. La nourriture était de très bonne qualité et le serveur, déguisé en costume de la période, était très bien informé sur le sujet de l’histoire et de la vie quotidienne au cours de cette période dans la région ; c’était étonnant d’apprendre qu’il y avait une recette pour les glaces pendant le 14ème siècle! Cependant, la chose la plus étrange, c’était le fait qu’il n’y avait pas de fourchettes ; pendant la période médiévale, les gens ne mangeaient pas avec une fourchette, seulement une cuillère et un couteau, et donc on a été privés d’une fourchette au cours de notre repas ; bien que nous ayons réussi, c’était encore assez bizarre.

J’ai rendu visite à Floorke, une amie de Sheffield à Aix-en-Provence pendant les vacances de Toussaint. J’avais passé le week-end avant à Barcelone avec des amis de Sheffield (Nathan et Jenny qui travaillent comme assistants de langue en Espagne), et donc j’ai pris le train direct à Aix, qui a duré 8 heures (c’était retardé pendant 2 heures, la galère!). C’était génial de visiter Aix ; elle a un certain charme avec ses vieux bâtiments et fontaines à chaque coin, c’était très bien d’y balader pendant un après-midi. L’équivalent à Perpignan, mis à part le centre historique typique, la vue des Pyrénées qui coupe le souffle m’accueille tous les jours sur le chemin à l’université, et je ne m’en oublierais jamais. Cela me rappelle à quel point cette région est particulière ; elle n’est pas la Provence, mais autre chose qui nous donne envie d’y rester.

La vue incroyables des montagnes à Perpignan

La vue incroyable des Pyrénées à Perpignan

Floorke et moi, on a visité Marseille ensemble aussi, une ville toute a fait différente à Aix, même si c’est à 45 minutes dans le bus. Marseille m’a vraiment impressionné, il n’y a pas d’autre ville similaire que j’ai jamais visité. Ce qui m’a étonné, c’était sa grande taille et diversité ; Marseille, étant un port gigantesque est la principale porte d’entrée en France de la Méditerranée, ce qui explique sa richesse culturelle. Le Vieux Port est impressionnant et l’Église Notre Dame de la Garde est surtout imposante ; elle se situe sur une grande colline que l’on peut voir de quelconque coin de Marseille. Cependant, quand l’on marche loin des principaux sites touristiques, on se trouve dans des zones assez troublantes où je n’aimerais pas me retrouver seule le soir. Marseille a l’air d’être une très belle ville avec ses grands monuments et lieux d’intérêt, toutefois en marchant autour des zones moins touristiques, nous nous sommes senties un peu comme ces lieux ont été négligés, oubliés dans le temps, et c’était très triste de les voir tomber en ruines ; cela soulignait qu’il y a un côté plus sombre à voir dans cette ville. Mon moment clé de Marseille était notre visite au Château d’If ; c’était très cool de le visiter alors que je suis en train de lire Le Comte de Monte-Cristo, c’était comme une excursion scolaire pour voir tous les sites mentionnés dans le livre.

Panorama de Marseille

Panorama de Marseille

Après avoir passé trois jours très sympas avec Floorke, j’ai rendu visite à André, un ami brésilien à Avignon avant de mon retour à Perpignan. J’ai beaucoup aimé Avignon, un de mes moments préférés était la visite du célèbre Pont d’Avignon qui contient deux chapelles (deux fonctions principales : un pont et un lieu de culte) ! Cependant, je n’y ai que passé six heures et ce n’était pas assez afin de bien profiter de la ville. Ce qui m’a intéressé le plus, c’était le Palais des papes dont je n’avais jamais entendu parler auparavant ; c’était une fois le centre du catholicisme occidental pendant le 14ème siècle lorsque le pape résidait à Avignon. De plus, le Palais reste la plus grande des constructions gothiques du Moyen Âge. Malheureusement, je n’avais pas l’occasion de le visiter mais je compte y aller la prochaine fois.

Sur Le Pont d'Avignon

Sur Le Pont d’Avignon

J’ai parvenu à visiter Barcelone deux fois de plus. La deuxième fois, mon copain James m’a rendu visite pendant un week-end. C’était bien de le voir pour la première fois depuis trois mois et j’ai pu lui montrer tous les meilleurs endroits de la ville que j’ai visités quelques semaines plus tôt. La dernière fois, (avant que j’attrape mon vol de l’aéroport de Barcelone la semaine prochaine!) c’était pendant une journée avec des étudiants Erasmus. Le trajet était gratuit en bus (un trajet très long mais gratuit !). On a réussi à obtenir quatre heures de temps libre à Barcelone ; c’était dommage parce que notre visite était courte et pressée. De toute façon, on a bien mangé (tapas, miam miam !) et on a dépensé beaucoup d’argent dans les magasins espagnols – succès.

Moi et James, Arc de Triomf

Moi et James, Arc de Triomf

La Sagrada Familia, otra vez!

La Sagrada Familia, otra vez!

Ici quand j’entre dans une pièce, que ce soit la banque, un magasin ou une salle de classe, tout le monde dit «Bonjour» et quand je sors toute le monde dit «au revoir». Je pense que je m’y suis habituée maintenant, c’est normal. Ce n’est pas le cas en Angleterre la plupart du temps, et au début de mon séjour, j’ai dû me rappeler de dire bonjour, sinon je pouvais paraître impolie. Mais, quand j’étais à Barcelone, j’ai fait la même chose : « Hola, adios, » pourtant tout comme l’Angleterre, ce n’est pas dans leur culture. Je dois m’en souvenir quand je retourne en Angleterre.

Je me suis rendue compte pendant le retour de Barcelone ce week-end, que c’était ma dernière excursion du semestre avant mon départ. J’ai l’impression que j’aie réussi à accomplir la majorité de ce que je voulais faire pendant mon séjour en France. C’était une occasion de voyager à tant d’endroits, pas loin en termes de distance, mais tous très uniques, dans une région que je ne connaissais pas avant mon arrivée. J’ai rencontré des gens d’une variété de cultures et d’origines. Je ne peux pas indiquer mon voyage préféré du semestre exactement. Tout ce que je peux exprimer, c’est que j’ai reçu un accueil très chaleureux à Perpi et que tout ce que j’ai fait au cours de ces quatre derniers mois l’a rendu un séjour inoubliable.

Mon expérience à l’université n’était pas toujours facile, comme prévu. Je peux m’identifier bien à beaucoup d’autres étudiants qui passent leur année à l’étranger dans une université française. Nous plaignons tous des mêmes questions. Malgré tout cela, je crois que l’Université de Perpignan a été compréhensive, en particulier le bureau Erasmus. De plus, j’ai eu la chance d’avoir des profs sympas qui sont passionnés par leurs sujets et qui sont très accueillants aux étudiants Erasmus. L’université ne reçoit pas beaucoup de financement, mais les profs se débrouillent avec les ressources dont ils disposent.

Mon séjour m’a donné une meilleure appréciation de choses que je tenais pour acquises, comme l’UE ; la liberté de bouger librement en Europe, de voyager, étudier et travailler. Je crois que c’est très difficile de maîtriser une langue sans avoir vécu dans un pays qui parle cette langue ; bien qu’après avoir vécu dans le sud de la France et que j’ai nettement développé mes connaissances sur la culture et la langue française, je n’ai que réussi à découvrir une très petite région de la France, du monde francophone, et il y a beaucoup plus à apprendre en dehors de cette région. Cependant, après avoir déménagé de tout ce que je connais, à une ville que je n’avais jamais encore visité, maintenant je crois que voyager n’est pas aussi difficile que cela peut paraître au début. Bien sûr qu’il est effrayant et que la transition n’est pas facile, mais qu’il n’est pas impossible non plus ; vous ne saurez jamais avant d’essayer.

Dans plusieurs semaines je vais recommencer et passer plusieurs mois en Espagne, dans une nouvelle ville avec de nouvelles personnes tout en découvrant une nouvelle langue et culture. Pourtant, je sais que tout va bien se passer parce que je l’ai déjà fait une fois. Une année à l’étranger nous donne les compétences pour l’avenir ; de sorte que travailler à l’étranger n’est pas aussi fou comme prévu, parce que nous savons déjà la réalité, parfois dure, mais qu’il vaut la peine.

Tout d’abord, je dois passer six examens cette semaine, mais ce samedi soir je vais aller voir le ballet de Carmen. J’ai déjà vu l’opéra de Carmen à Londres l’année dernière, cela m’a beaucoup plu, donc je suis contente de voir une autre adaptation. J’espère d’organiser une petite réunion avec quelques amis avant mon départ aussi parce que je serai la première à partir.

La France, tu vas me manquer… À bientôt !

Untitled

A Day in Montpellier

Leave a comment Standard

Last Saturday we took a day trip to Montpellier, which is an hour and a half away on the train from Perpignan.

10801860_10154783128400447_3597189263174686015_n

Me in front of the Porte du Peyreu

Porte du Peyrou: beautiful monument and very impressive. Just a little further along are the city gardens and the Aquadukt Saint-Clement. It’s such a great area to walk around. The funniest thing was that due to the nice weather, there were people sunbathing on the grass in November – I cannot get my head around that.

10615352_10154783130595447_175835063585233357_n

Cathedrale St-Pierre

The Cathedrale St-Pierre is so impressive, although the interior was a bit of a disappointment as it was closed-off ue to falling stones from the roof (oh dear!). It is right next door to the Medical School for the university. It is such a cool location, I would love to study somewhere like that!  We tried to get in, but the security guard wouldn’t let us enter. There were some other tourists behind us and they somehow managed to get a sneek-peek inside – I wonder how they managed that…

11371_10154783129640447_8133223107782212308_n

Aquadukt Saint Clement

I was surprised by just how compact the city was and just how easy it was to walk to everywhere we wanted to go. Although it is November, we were so lucky with the weather. It was a beautiful sunny day and quite warm – it looked like it was just the beginning of autumn with the turning colour of the trees:

Autumn colours at the Antigone

Autumn colours at the Antigone

250207_10154783130245447_1514198655189510274_n

10441053_10154783129975447_411135630185410438_n

1507917_10154783130460447_9115563341401502813_n

1377570_804549936250743_2394269104598233621_n

Les filles, Porte du Peyrou

Montpellier is a beautiful city. It’s a great place to walk around and there are plenty of cultural things to do. We were only there for the afternoon, so we just walked around, did some shopping and had a great lunch in a small square crammed with lots of different restaurants:

Yum

C’était trop bon!

Today the universitya fait le pont.’  When I heard this expression for the first time last week, I was very confused – it literally means ‘to make the bridge.’ However, in context, it means ‘to have an extended weekend,’ and many classes were cancelled (although mine still went ahead). This was due to the fact that tomorrow (Tuesday 11th Nov) is a jour ferié (National Holiday),  Rememberance Day (yes, this is a National Holiday in France and so there are no classes at schools/universities and many businesses and shops are closed). When a National Holiday lands on a Tuesday in France, people can choose to ‘faire le pont’ so that they can have a 4-day weekend – well, more like a 5-day weekend because the university purposely avoids having any classes on Fridays… smooth France, smooth…

As I have no classes tomorrow, I get to catch up on work by doing a speaking presentation and a Spanish translation.

Exams are in December but we have been told that it is unlikely we will be told the confirmed dates for our exams until 2 weeks before (i.e. we will find out the first week of December – talk about late notice!). Exams are so casual here; we can choose whether we do them in December or January, it is such a different atmosphere to that of Sheffield. I have chosen to do all of mine in December, so I can officially finish my semester here before Christmas. Lucky me, a revision-free Christmas break!

Four days until I go to Barcelona again!

Bonne semaine 🙂

Untitled

Bisous de Provence

Comments 2 Standard

During the holidays (Toussaint) last week, as well as Barcelona which I blogged about here, I also had stops in Aix, Marseille and Avignon before my return to Perpignan.

I took a 5-hour train straight from Barcelona to Aix-en-Provence, however, this soon changed into an 8-hour journey because we had a delay in Béziers for over two and a half hours! Luckily there was a plug-socket next to me and I could enjoy listening to music and reading a large chunk of Le Comte de Monte-Cristo. I arrived in Aix after midnight, very exhausted.

Visiting Provence was a dream come true because I have heard so much about this beautiful region, but I also got to catch-up with my coursemates Floorke and Holly from Sheffield in Aix where they are studying this semester, and André who was an old housemate of mine here in Perpignan, who has relocated to Avignon.

Aix, is a popular tourist desination and this is reflected by it’s high prices. It’s such a great place to walk around, wih its rustic cobbled streets and interesting shops, and of course, the fountains that are found everywhere. Floorke showed me around the town, the university where she is studying and we also saw Samba a new French film I had been hoping to see, definitely recommend it!

Aix-en-Provence

Aix-en-Provence

Aix-en-Provence

Aix-en-Provence

Aix-en-Provence

Aix-en-Provence

On my second day in Provence, Floorke and I visited Marseille, which is only 40 minutes away by bus from Aix-en-Provence. It is such a strange and exciting city, although I can’t see myself living there or wanting to walk around on my own. It’s one of the major gateways to France due to having a large port with connections to Corsica, Tunisia and Algeria and being close to the Italian border. Walking around the city, I hardly heard any French being spoken, but instead a great mix of languages from around the Mediterranean.

Marseille is such a big city, and so we were not able to explore all of its touristic delights in one day; for example, we didn’t get to visit the NotreDame de la Garde cathedral which is one of Marseille’s well-known symbols, located on the highest point in Marseille. However, everywhere we went, we could see it in the distance.

Vie of the Notre-Dame de la Garde from exiting the train station

View of the Notre-Dame de la Garde from exiting the train station

The Vieux Port (Old Port) is one of the major tourist spots in Marseille, and there are some lovely walks you can do along the promonade.

Le Vieux Port

Le Vieux Port

We hoped to make our way to something called the Maritime Station which was a bit of a walk away because we were hoping to catch a boat to the Château d’If. The walk to get there was very picturesque however we were told we were in the completely wrong location and the ferry station was in fact in the Vieux Port, where we had just been. However, the walk there wasn’t completely wasted because we also stumbled across the impressive Cathédrale Sainte-Marie-Majeure de Marseille.

Cathédrale Sainte-Marie-Majeure de Marseille

Cathédrale Sainte-Marie-Majeure de Marseille

Cathédrale Sainte-Marie-Majeure de Marseille

Cathédrale Sainte-Marie-Majeure de Marseille

Panorama of Marseille

Panorama of Marseille

After a slight detour to the cathedral, we made our way back to the Vieux Port to catch the ferry to the Château d’If. I particuarly wanted to go here because it is one of the main locations, as well as Marseille itself, in the book of The Count of Monte-Cristo  by Alexandre Dumas, which as I said earlier, I am currently reading. As a kid, I fell in love with the film and I had always hoped to read the book sometime in my life, but now that I study French and have the ability to read it in the original text, makes it even better.

Me and Floorke on the ferry boat to the Chateau d'If

Me and Floorke on the ferry boat to the Château d’If (a bit windy!)

The ferry boat from the Vieux Port takes around 20 minutes and costs €9 for an aller-retour (return ticket) with free entry into the Château for European citizens under 26. It’s a great opportunity as well to take a boat just for the incredible view of Marseille from the sea. I was not in Marseille after-dark, but I am sure that it would be an incredible view when the city is all lit up.

Le Chateau d'If

Le Chateau d’If

The Château d’If itself is interesting to walk around, and there is a guide who talks for 15 minutes when you first arrive who sets the scene of what happened there and a little bit of how it came to be so famous, mostly thanks to Dumas’ fiction novel. It’s definitely worth the visit if you find yourself in Marseille.

In the evening after going for Japanese food, we met up wth Holly and went to an irish Bar to catch up to round off an amazing day.

The next day, I had to catch a train to Avignon very early in the morning, however it turned out to be a bus and then a train, which resulted in me running around Aix between the bus and trains stations. Avignon is not far at all from Aix, and I arrived there at 10:30am. I had until 4:30pm to see as much of Avignon as I could before getting a 3-hour train back to Perpignan.

Avignon is a wonderful place: very historic, beautiful buildings such as the Palais des Papes, parks, the original remparts (city-walls) and of course, the famous Pont d’Avignon! 6-hours was sufficient to see the bare-minimum of Avignon, but there was still so much to see, such as the Palais des Papes, which I didn’t enter. Beautiful places, take me back to Provence!

Le Palais des Papes

Le Palais des Papes

iphone Oct14 519

View of Avignon

View of Avignon

Le pont d'Avignon

Le Pont d’Avignon

Avignon

Avignon

The highlight for me in Avignon was definitely the Pont d’Avignon. Although I had heard so much about this famous bridge, I soon found out that I hardly knew anything about it! Entry is 4€ for students but this also includes an audio-guide. I really recommend you pick one of these up because it gives so much information about the past, present and future of this bridge. How it came to become a bridge that goes no where, the origins of the famous song ‘Sur Le Pont d’Avignon’ and also, I found that there are in fact two chapels on the bridge that you can visit. Yep, this bridge not only intended to serve as a gateway from A to B across the river, but also as a place of religious significance which makes it quite unique.

Sur Le Pont d'Avignon

Sur Le Pont d’Avignon

Sur Le Pont d'Avignon

Sur Le Pont d’Avignon – one of the chapels

Sur Le Pont d'Avignon

Sur Le Pont d’Avignon

Sur Le Pont d'Avignon

Sur Le Pont d’Avignon

Sur Le Pont d'Avignon

Sur Le Pont d’Avignon

Sur Le Pont d'Avignon

Sur Le Pont d’Avignon

Sur Le Pont d'Avignon

Sur Le Pont d’Avignon

Palais des Papes

Palais des Papes

Another interesting thing I learnt in Avignon was the story behind the Palais des Papes which I admittedly had never heard of before. The Palais des Papes was once served as a fortress and a palace, and remains to be one of the largest gothic constructions of its kind within Europe. The ‘papal residence’ was in fact the seat of Western Christianity during the medieval period, not in fact Rome. I find this fascinating because this seriously put Avignon on the map in the 14th century, however most people nowadays mostly associate this city with the Pont d’Avignon. Unfortunately I did not have enough time to visit the interior as that itself could possibly take an entire day. However if I find myself in Avignon again this will definitely be on the list of places I need to go.

I hope this blog post has shown just how much of an amazing time I had during Toussaint in Aix, Marseille and Avignon. All three are beautiful places, each with their own individual charm and identity. I enjoyed them all the more as I got to spend time with friends who I haven’t been able to see in a matter of months as well. I feel so privileged to live in the south of France and for all these incredible places to be just a few hours away from me on the train.

The first semester of my Year Abroad here will soon be coming to a close in a matter of weeks, as I will finally pack up to leave on the 19th December to catch my flight back to the UK. Although I miss home (The Wirral) greatly, Perpignan has become a third home for me after Sheffield (my university city). This is where, over the past few months I have made friends and memories that have made an impact on my life. Looking back at all the photos of the things we have done, I’d like to think that so far I have really made the most of my time here, and it is a fact that there has not been one weekend where I haven’t taken the opportunity to explore a new place of interest.

Yesterday I went on a day-trip to Montpellier with a group of friends from Perpignan and met up again with Anna and Nakashi who came from Nîmes for the day which was lovely. This time next weekend I will be back in Barcelona to see James, who I haven’t seen since before I went to Israel in August. Somehow I need to start revision as well, as all my exams in Perpignan will be in the final week of December before the Christmas holidays!

Bonne semaine 🙂

Untitled

Nîmes (en français)

Leave a comment Standard

22/10/14 Journal de bord 3

Il y a deux semaines (10-12 octobre) je suis allée à Nîmes pour voir un concert de musique d’Émilie Simon. De plus, j’ai visité Anna, autre étudiante de Sheffield, qui est assistante de langue à Nîmes ; elle nous a montré sa nouvelle ville pour cette année, qui est très belle et plein d’histoire et culture, quelque chose que Perpignan malheureusement n’a pas trop. Il y a tellement de choses à raconter de ce week-end-là, mais je vais commencer par parler de la bise et de la météo.

La première chose que j’ai trouvé bizarre, c’était comment on fait la bise à Nîmes ; ici à Perpignan on fait deux bises, et ça, ça va, mais à Nîmes, c’est trois ! C’était un peu gênant parce que je ne me l’attendais pas et j’avais l’impression qu’elle a duré une éternité!

On est arrivée le vendredi soir et tous les commerces étaient fermés. C’était comme une ville fantôme. On a vite appris que Nîmes était sous la vigilance rouge à cause des inondations, qui a expliqué la situation. La rivière débordait et il y avait beaucoup de gens dans la rue prenant des photos de ce spectacle. Ce week-end-là, il faisait très chaud et sec à Perpignan, c’est comme un tout autre climat.

Des inondations

Des inondations

Le dimanche, tous les monuments étaient fermés à nouveau et ainsi on ne pouvait pas faire grand-chose. Heureusement, on a visité la plupart des sites touristiques le samedi (La Tour Magne, Les Arènes et Les Jardins de la Fontaine), mais on n’avait pas l’occasion d’entrer la Maison Carrée. Le dimanche après-midi, on a visité l’Office du tourisme et la dame nous a suggéré de partir dès que possible à cause de la vigilance rouge. Cependant, on a organisé un covoiturage et c’était pour 17h qui était trop tard. Néanmoins, le chauffeur était très gentil et il est venu nous chercher trois heures plus tôt que prévu. C’était dommage de ne pas rester plus longtemps, mais le dimanche j’ai commencé avec un mauvais rhume et je me sentais très malade sur le chemin du retour, il était donc pour le mieux. C’était un covoiturage un peu étrange parce que pendant le trajet, le conducteur a ramassé un auto-stoppeur au péage. Il était un étudiant des beaux-arts à Marseille et ce qui était drôle, son nom était Rafael, qui est le nom d’un peintre italien très connu (Raphael), et on a ri nerveusement dans le siège arrière de la voiture. Il avait décidé brusquement la veille de passer trois mois en auto-stop à travers l’Europe, avec une tente, un sac à dos et cent euros dans son portefeuille. Je me demande comment ça va pour lui… Mais bon, je vais raconter un petit peu de ma visite à Nîmes.

Nîmes est une ville historique avec de nombreuses ruines romaines, et c’est une ville que je voulais visiter depuis de nombreuses années pour cette raison. Les Arènes est magnifique, et à mon avis est beaucoup mieux que celui de Rome. Il est plus petit, mais il est en fait en meilleur état, et il n’y avait guère de touristes! Ce qui m’a choqué, c’était le manque de sécurité – certaines personnes balançaient leurs pieds sur le bord tout en haut, nous plaisantons comment cela n’arriverait jamais en Angleterre, en raison des règlements de sécurité les plus strictes – mais c’est vrai ! C’était génial, qu’on pouvait explorer les ruines, mais ce serait très facile pour quelqu’un de se blesser ou de tomber si un problème survenait. Il n’y avait personne pour assurer la sécurité des visiteurs. Il n’y a pas de barrières pour empêcher les gens de tomber ou de sauter non plus.

Les Arenes

Les Arenes

Me at the top of Les Arenes

Me at the top of Les Arenes

La Tour Magne

La Tour Magne

Le Temple de Diane

Le Temple de Diane

On a choisi d’aller voir Émilie Simon en concert parce qu’elle est l’un de mes musiciennes françaises préférées. En fait, j’ai parlé de l’un de ses albums, Franky Knight, dans mon dernier examen oral à Sheffield le dernier semestre. J’ai entendu parler d’Émilie Simon du film ‘La Délicatesse,’ car son album ‘Franky Knight’ était sélectionné pour la musique du film (c’est un beau film et il y a aussi un livre du même nom que j’aime bien) ; c’était un bon choix de musique et très intelligent – l’album s’agit du deuil d’Émilie pour son amant, François Chevalier (ce qui s’est passé dans la vie réelle). Dans le film, ‘La Délicatesse,’ Nathalie (le personnage principal du film, joué par Audrey Tautou) est en deuil de la mort de son mari, qui s’appelle François aussi, qui a été écrasé dans un accident de voiture. Ça donne un lien fort avec la ligne de l’histoire et de la musique parce qu’on peut même sentir comme si c’est Nathalie qui chant les paroles. Je dois avouer que ce film est un peu déprimant, mais bon, ça c’est le cinéma français, et vous le savez déjà ! Ne vous inquiétez pas, il y a une fin heureuse pour Nathalie!

Le dernier album d’Émilie Simon, ‘Mue,’ est un retour au français, parce que ses derniers albums étaient en anglais. «Mue» est tout au sujet de nouveaux départs. J’aime beaucoup cet album et je le recommande, mais Émilie est en fait mieux en concert. J’ai appris les mots ‘la fosse,’ et ‘les gradins’ grâce au concert. On était dans la fosse pour le concert, mais malheureusement, pour une raison ou une autre, personne n’a dansé donc ce n’était pas un concert très dynamique, c’était dommage. Emilie était en robe dorée, elle a joué de la guitare électrique et avait un appareil électronique étrange sur son bras gauche, c’était bizarre mais assez cool.

BzurW4jCQAE0J66 BzurW4UCcAEsy5G BzurW36CYAAYAXLAlors, c’est tout pour l’instant. Je pourrais continuer à parler au sujet de mon expérience au restaurant ‘La Bardiche’, qui spécialise dans la cuisine catalane du 14ème siècle (c’était un peu bizarre…), et ma visite à une réserve de tortues à Sorède le week-end dernier, mais je vais tout raconter la prochaine fois, je pense que je perdrais la raison si j’écrivais plus…

Bonne vacances pour tous en France cette semaine pour Toussaint. J’ai un dernier cours de portugais à 8h demain avant de partir pour Barcelone, Aix et Avignon pour visiter des amis !

Untitled